LF TheSerif

TheSerif is part of the Thesis superfamily which Luc(as) de Groot first published in 1994. It was conceived to be the perfect secondary font within the Thesis system, using it for headlines, subheads, pull quotes, etc. TheSerif has also been used successfully as a text font in its own right.

TheSerif is a low-contrast typeface – i.e., the differences between thin and thick strokes are not very pronounced. Yet the reference to writing with the broad-nibbed pen is still present, giving the letters a diagonal stress and a forward flow that facilitates reading. The roman letterforms tend to have some characteristics of an italic or written construction. Yet the italic forms themselves are very distinctive: they were not derived from the upright but were individually designed while perfectly complementing the roman forms.

TheSerif in editorial design

In Ellen Lupton’s didactic guide Thinking with type, TheSerif is used as secondary typeface for the interior typography, and as main typeface on the cover.

In Ellen Lupton’s didactic guide Thinking with type, TheSerif is used as secondary typeface for the interior typography, and as main typeface on the cover.

In Ellen Lupton’s didactic guide Thinking with type, TheSerif is used as secondary typeface for the interior typography, and as main typeface on the cover.

Arabic typography, a comprehensive sourcebook (2001) was typeset in TheSerif with subheads in TheSans. Written and designed by Huda Smitshuijzen Abifarès.

Arabic typography, a comprehensive sourcebook (2001) was typeset in TheSerif with subheads in TheSans. Written and designed by Huda Smitshuijzen Abifarès.

Arabic typography, a comprehensive sourcebook (2001) was typeset in TheSerif with subheads in TheSans. Written and designed by Huda Smitshuijzen Abifarès.